Blog Hop: Chock Full of Advice

  It has been a while since I have done one of these blog hop posts. So I thought that it was time to do another one.

Picture from:
http://www.bloglovin.com/frame?post=3160546671&group=0&frame_type=a&blog=5415227&frame=1&click=0&user=0 

  Here it goes...


  The topic of this hop is all about advice. What is the best advice you've ever received from a trainer or another rider? And what is the worst advice?

  In the horse world, everyone has an opinion. We all have different ideas and methods that we want to share. Some of them are helpful and some of them aren't. This isn't to say that some of the advice I've been given was absolutely horrible, it just didn't work for me.

  So my best advice was probably to leave all of my troubles out of the barn. I've learnt quickly throughout the years that horses pick up on our emotions when others can't. They'll react out of character because of that as well, especially if they're a more sensitive horse. When you're upset or nervous or angry, your body tenses up and makes the horse feel uncomfortable. That might lead to a horse being anxious, wanting to bolt or being heavy on the bit. The funny thing is that you might not realise that you're feeling this way until you're around horses. They are our mirrors. 

Picture from:
http://activerain.trulia.com/blogsview/4309214/horsey-friday-fun-facts---horses-are-mirrors-

  This advice has helped me to forget about everything that might be happening in my life for a little while and enjoy my time at the barn. I've learnt to enjoy spending the time brushing, riding and cooling off.

  It's not an easy thing to do at first. Believe me, I'm still working on it. You need to train yourself to shut off all of the noise in your mind. Try to focus on just enjoying the ride.

  The worst advice I had ever gotten was probably along the lines of doing whatever you need to do to get the job done. Shortcutting with horses can be dangerous, especially when training. Sure you can force your horse to jump over a scary fence or push him into the scary trailer, but what does that accomplish? You've gotten the job done, but what about the relationship between you and your horse? He won't have much trust or respect for you that way. 

  Oddly enough, Warwick Schiller has done a video recently along this same topic. You can check out his video below.

Video from:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC413ZepFqtG6Bhb8Lv7ugFA

  In the end, I believe you learn a lot from both good and bad advice as a rider and as a person for that matter. They develop and form your beliefs. 

  If you were to take both the best advice and worst advice I had just talked about, you'd probably be able to see a lesson that I have learnt as a rider. This lesson is that a having solid relationship with your horse is important. You need to be there for each other completely (which means leaving your personal problems out of the barn) and you need to take time to figure each other out (and not cut corners). Trust, clear communication, respect and involvement are all other important factors that help build a good partnership. I've talked about this many times already and I could keep on talking about it (but that will make this post way too long).  

  What is the worst and best advice you have ever gotten? Leave it in the comments below or participate in the blog hop. I would love to know what you all have to say. While you're at it, why not also read the posts that other bloggers have written in response to this blog hop.

  Thank you for reading and have a great weekend everyone!



  Until next time, happy riding!


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